INTRODUCTION TO TINCTURES


tinc·ture

ˈtiNG(k)(t)SHər/

noun

plural noun: tinctures

  1. a medicine made by dissolving a drug in alcohol, vinegar, or oil.

"the remedies can be administered in the form of tinctures"

Synonyms:  solution, suspension, infusion, elixir
 

Tinctures are liquid extracts made from herbs that you take orally (by mouth).  Tinctures are primarily absorbed through the sublingual veins (the sublingual vein is a vein which drains the tongue), therefore the best way to use tinctures is sublingually (under the tongue).  This makes them different than edibles, which are absorbed through the stomach and must go through hepatic metabolism.

Titration or dose control is easily achieved by the number of drops a patient places under the tongue where the medicine is rapidly absorbed into the arterial system and is quickly transported to the brain and body.

DIRECTIONS FOR SUBLINGUAL APPLICATION:

1. Place the dose of tincture under your tongue.
2. Use your tongue to gently “paint” the tincture around your inner cheeks
3. Take ten very slow and very deep breaths: in through your mouth and out through your nose and then swallow the tincture.